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28 January 2020

The latest news and headlines from Yahoo! News. Get breaking news stories and in-depth coverage with videos and photos.
  • Harvard professor charged with hiding China ties, payments

    A Harvard University professor was charged Tuesday with lying about his ties to a Chinese-run recruitment program and concealing payments he received from the Chinese government for research. Charles Lieber, chair of the department of chemistry and chemical biology, is accused of hiding his involvement in China's Thousand Talents Plan, a program designed to lure people with knowledge of foreign technology and intellectual property to China. Lieber was arrested early Tuesday at his office at the Ivy League university, officials said.


  • White House Threatens to Veto Legislation Aimed at Curbing Trump’s Military Power in Iran

    The White House on Tuesday threatened to veto legislation proposed by Democrats that would limit President Trump's military options and require him to seek congressional authorization before taking military action against Iran, saying the proposed constraints would “embolden our enemies.”The measures would repeal the 2002 Authorization for Use of Military Force, which authorized the war in Iraq, and block funding for further military operations in Iran that are not approved by Congress. The House is set to vote on the proposals this week."The 2002 AUMF has long been understood to authorize the use of force for, among other purposes, addressing threats emanating from Iraq, including threats such as ISIS — a group whose objectives have included establishing an Islamic state in Iraq and using that state to support terrorism against the United States — as well as threats directed by Iran,” the White House said."This legislation would undermine the Administration’s reestablishment of deterrence with Iran, which could perversely make violent conflict with Iran more likely," the administration added.The administration incurred the ire of Democrats and some Republicans earlier this month when the U.S. military carried out the assassination of Iranian military commander Qasem Soleimani in Baghdad, critics of the move saying it tempted war with Iran.The drone strike that killed Soleimani, the head of Iran’s elite Quds Force, came after several attacks by Iranian-backed forces in Iraq on U.S. troops, one of which killed an American contractor. The Pentagon claimed Soleimani was “actively developing" plans to attack Americans at the time of his death, although officials have declined to produce specific evidence to that point.Democratic Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia said earlier this month that the Senate has the votes to pass a measure to limit Trump's military power in Iran after at least four Republicans said they would support it.


  • Historians unveil rare photos of Sobibor death camp

    Hundreds of newly discovered photographs, including some taken at the Sobibor death camp, represent a "quantum leap" in research into Nazi crimes against humanity, historians at the Berlin museum Topography of Terror said Tuesday. Historians said the "exceptional collection" provided unprecedented insights into the Sobibor camp in German Nazi-occupied Poland, about which little is known even 75 years after the end of World War II. The trove, consisting of 361 black-and-white photos and several written documents, also includes photos believed to show convicted Nazi guard John Demjanjuk, who denied ever being at Sobibor.


  • Taliban says it gunned down U.S. military plane in Afghanistan, killing all personnel onboard

    The Taliban said it had shot down a U.S. military plane in the central Afghan province of Ghazni on Monday, killing all personnel onboard.


  • Government records show that Kobe Bryant's helicopter used to be owned by the state of Illinois

    Bryant's helicopter was owned by an operator called Island Express Holding Corp., which purchased it from Illinois in 2015.


  • Major 7.7 magnitude quake hits Caribbean off Jamaica: USGS

    A major 7.7 magnitude quake struck Tuesday in the Caribbean northwest of Jamaica, the US Geological Survey reported, raising the risk of tsunami waves in the region. The US agency said the quake hit at a depth of 10 kilometers (six miles), at 1910 GMT -- 125 kilometers northwest of Lucea, Jamaica.


  • China Demands Apology From Danish Newspaper Over Virus Cartoon

    (Bloomberg) -- The Chinese Embassy to Denmark wants the newspaper Jyllands-Posten to apologize for publishing a drawing that depicts China’s flag with virus symbols instead of five stars.“We express our strong indignation and demand that Jyllands-Posten and [cartoonist] Niels Bo Bojesen reproach themselves for their mistake and publicly apologize to the Chinese people,” the embassy said in a statement posted on its website.When asked to comment, Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen avoided any direct reference to Jyllands-Posten’s cartoon.“I have nothing to say on the matter other than [to note that] we have a very strong tradition in Denmark not just for freedom of speech for also for freedom of satire, and we’ll continue to have that in the future,” she said, according to multiple news media including Politiken. “This is a well known Danish position and we’re not going to change it.”Denmark’s largest newspaper has faced international backlash over its cartoons in the past. In 2005, the paper printed 12 drawings of the Prophet Muhammad, which angered many nations in which Islam is the main religion and sparked a diplomatic crisis. Back then, Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen also defended freedom of speech and said governments had no place telling newspapers what to write.The Chinese flag was printed in the opinion section of the newspaper’s Monday edition with a caption titled “Corona virus”.Editor-in-Chief Jacob Nybroe said the paper won’t apologize.“We can’t apologize for something we don’t think is wrong,” Nybroe told news agency Ritzau. “We have no intention to demean or mock but we don’t think this drawing is doing that.”(Updates with comment from Denmark’s prime minister)To contact the reporter on this story: Morten Buttler in Copenhagen at mbuttler@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Christian Wienberg at cwienberg@bloomberg.net, Tasneem Hanfi BröggerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


  • British man dies in US immigration detention in Florida

    * Death of man, 39, initially attributed to hanging * UK Foreign Office said to be in touch with man’s wifeA British man has died while being held in US immigration detention in Florida, the Guardian has confirmed.The death was first reported by BuzzFeed News, which said the man was 39 years old and that the cause was initially attributed to asphyxiation due to hanging. The incident was reported to have occurred on Saturday last week.“Our staff are in contact with the US authorities following the death of a British man in Florida,” said a spokeswoman for the Foreign Office in London.Foreign Office officials are understood to have been in contact with the deceased man’s wife, as US officials investigate the circumstances of the death.Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Ice) did not respond to multiple requests for comment from the Guardian.In a statement to BuzzFeed, the agency identified the deceased man as Ben James Owen and clarified he had died at the Baker county detention center in Macclenny, Florida. Officials said Owen had entered the US on a temporary visa in July and had been arrested on suspicion of felony aggravated stalking, felony false imprisonment, domestic assault, and violating the conditions of his pre-trial release. The agency said the case remained under investigation.The incident marks the fifth death at a detention centre in the 2020 fiscal year, which begins in October 2019. There were eight deaths in Ice detention in the 2019 fiscal year.The immigration detention population in the United States has soared under the Trump administration. Last year Ice detained 510,854 people, compared with 396,448 in 2018. The administration has also increased its use of detention facilities, mostly run by private security companies, with a new concentration of detention centres opening in the deep south.Medical provision and mental health care at detention facilities has come under increased criticism under the Trump administration after a spate of high profile deaths since 2017.At the end of last year House Democrats on the oversight and reform committee launched an inquiry to investigate a “troubling pattern of abuse and poor treatment” of migrants in custody.


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